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Cumbrian GPs urge children and young people to protect themselves from measles

Homepage » News » Cumbrian GPs urge children and young people to protect themselves from measles

Call for children and young people to have MMR vaccine

Cumbrian GPs urge children and young people to protect themselves from measles

Posted on Thursday 25th April 2013
Dr Hugh Reeve

Dr Hugh Reeve

Cumbrian GPs are urging parents to ensure that their children are protected against measles as the number of reported cases nationally increases. In addition young adults and teenagers should check they’re fully vaccinated with both doses of the MMR (measles, mumps and rubella) vaccine.

The measles outbreak is affecting part of England and Wales, and family doctors in Cumbria want to prevent a similar outbreak developing in the county.

Though there has been only one confirmed case of measles this year in Cumbria and 95 per cent of parents are having their babies vaccinated, there are still many teenagers in the county who are unprotected, as they were not vaccinated as children.

Measles is an infectious viral illness that is spread when infected people cough or sneeze.

The most common symptoms are fever, cough, sore eyes and a rash that develops 3-4 days after the onset of illness, starting with the face and head and spreading down the body.

Chair of Cumbria Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) and Cumbrian GP, Dr Hugh Reeve said: “Measles is highly infectious and anyone who has not previously been vaccinated is at risk when it gets into a community.

“While vaccination rates amongst children in Cumbria are currently amongst the highest in the country, there are still a number of teenagers who failed to get protected when they were younger.

“It is not too late and no one, anywhere in Cumbria, should take the risk of catching measles when a safe and effective vaccine is available.

“If you believe you have not had or you want your child to receive the MMR vaccine, contact your GP surgery. This is a safe vaccine.”

The first dose of MMR vaccine is normally given at age 13 months and the second between the ages of 3 and 4 years, before the child goes to school.

However, children of any age (over one) including teenagers and young adults should still consider vaccination if they missed out at the recommended ages.

Posted on Thursday 25th April 2013

 

 
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